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Jury
Laurie Anderson
Jacqueline Bosnjak
J.C. Herz
Warrington Hudlin
Surj Patel
Eric Paulos
Paul Miller aka DJ Spooky
Christiane Paul
Holly Willis

Laurie Anderson

Laurie Anderson is one of today's premier performance artists. Known primarily for her multimedia presentations she has cast herself in roles as varied as visual artist, composer, poet, photographer, filmmaker, electronics whiz, vocalist, and instrumentalist.

O Superman launched Anderson's recording career in 1980, rising to number two on the British pop charts and subsequently appearing on Big Science, the first of her seven albums on the Warner Brothers label. Other record releases include Mister Heartbreak, United States Live, Strange Angels, Bright Red, and the soundtrack to her feature film Home of the Brave. A deluxe box set of her Warner Brothers output, Talk Normal, was released in the fall of 2000 on Rhino/Warner Archives. In 2001, Anderson released her first record for Nonesuch Records, entitled Life on a String, which was followed by Live in New York, recorded at Town Hall in New York City in September 2001, and released in May 2002.

Anderson has toured the United States and internationally numerous times with shows ranging from simple spoken word performances to elaborate multimedia events. Major works include United States I-V (1983), Empty Places (1990), The Nerve Bible (1995), and Songs and Stories for Moby Dick, a multimedia stage performance based on the novel by Herman Melville. Songs and Stories for Moby Dick toured internationally throughout 1999 and 2000. In the fall of 2001, Anderson toured the United States and Europe with a band, performing music from Life on a String. She has also presented many solo works, including Happiness, which premiered in 2001 and toured internationally through Spring 2003.

Anderson has published six books including "Laurie Anderson" by RoseLee Goldberg (Abrams, 2000), a retrospective of her visual work. Text from AndersonÕs solo performances appears in the book Extreme Exposure, edited by Jo Bonney. She has also written the entry for New York for the Encyclopedia Brittanica.

Laurie Anderson's visual work has been presented in major museums throughout the United States and Europe. In 2003, The Musˇe Art Contemporain of Lyon in France produced a touring retrospective of her work, entitled The Record of the Time: Sound in the Work of Laurie Anderson. This retrospective included installation, audio, instruments, video and art objects and spans AndersonÕs career from the 1970's to her most current works. It continued to tour internationally from 2003 to 2005. As a visual artist, Anderson is represented by the Sean Kelly Gallery in New York where her exhibition, The Waters Reglitterized, opened in September 2005.

As a composer, Anderson has contributed music to films by Wim Wenders and Jonathan Demme; dance pieces by Bill T. Jones, Trisha Brown, Molissa Fenley, and a score for Robert LePage's theater production, Far Side of the Moon. She has created pieces for National Public Radio, The BBC, and Expo '92 in Seville. In 1997 she curated the two-week Meltdown Festival at Royal Festival Hall in London. Her most recent orchestra work Songs for A.E. premiered at Carnegie Hall in February 2000 performed by the American Composers Orchestra and later toured Europe with the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra conducted by Dennis Russell Davies.

Recognized worldwide as a groundbreaking leader in the use of technology in the arts, Anderson collaborated with Interval Research Corporation, a research and development laboratory founded by Paul Allen and David Liddle, in the exploration of new creative tools, including the Talking Stick. She created the introduction sequence for the first segment of the PBS special Art 21, a series about Art in the 21st century. Her awards include the 2001 Tenco Prize for Songwriting in San Remo, Italy and the 2001 Deutsche Schallplatten prize for Life On A String as well as grants from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

In 2002 Anderson was appointed the first artist-in-residence of NASA. Other recent projects include a commission to create a series of audio visual installations and a high definition film, Hidden Inside Mountains, for the World Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan and a series of programs for French radio called "Rien dans mes Poches/Nothing in my Pockts". Her score for Trisha Brown's acclaimed piece "O Composite" premiered at the Opera Garnier in Paris in December 2004. Anderson was also part of the team that created the opening ceremony for the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. Currently she is working on a series of very long walks. Her current solo performance "The End of the Moon"will continue to tour the U.S. and Europe throughout 2006. Anderson lives in New York City.
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Jacqueline Bosnjak (jacqui_m@mac.com)

IDEALOGUE & TRICYCLE NYC

-Experience-based Access driven Entertainment
-Exponential Marketing
-Quantum Distribution

IDEALOGUE operates as a highly defined and curated distributive network of access that thoughtfully co-creates projects with a focus on the production of culture beyond the act of consumption.
As markets give way to networks ideas and concepts that create experiences and emotional capital become prevalent in a organism where the production of culture becomes more important that the production of the physical product.In a network the question is how can we exchange value to create value? The model for business is co-creation.

New York agency IDEALOGUE: Creative Director's Jacqueline Bosnjak and Mark Beukes. IDEALOGUE & TRICYCLE NYC have created & partnered with adidas on multiple viral entertainment properties including: adicolor Podcasts, adicolor Chinatown, The Bronx Soundwalk, FANATIC, and mobile entertainment property Pax Athletica. Other clients include: Burton Snowboards, MINI Cooper and Q Department.

TRICYCLE NYC is the mobile publishing division publishing.
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J.C. Herz

J.C. Herz (jnhq@yahoo.com) is a researcher and designer with a background in ecology and computer game design.

Drawing from an understanding of ecology, online social dynamics, complex systems and i nformation theory, J.C.'s focus is multiplayer interaction design, and systems that leverage the intrinsic characteristics of networked communication. Clients include multinational corporations (Nokia, Herman Miller), nonprofit organizations (PBS, MacArthur Foundation, AARP), and the National Science Foundation, where she serves as a member of NSFs federal advisory committee for education. She is the author of two books, Surfing on the Internet (Little Brown, 1994), an ethnography of cyberspace before the web, and Joystick Nation: How Videogames Ate Our Quarters, Won Our Hearts, and Rewired Our Minds (Little Brown, 1997), a history of videogames which traces the cultural and technological evolution of the first medium that was born digital, and how it shaped the minds of a generation weaned on Atari. J.C. published 100 essays on the grammar and syntax of game design in New York Times between 1998-2000. She has also contributed to Esther Dyson's Release 1.0, Rolling Stone, and Wired.
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Warrington Hudlin

Warrington Hudlin is the Founder & Chief of dvRepublic.org and the President of the Black Filmmaker Foundation (BFF). Warrington Hudlin has built a distinguished career as a pioneering black filmmaker, organizer, and curator. Hudlin is the recipient of the Trailblazer Award from the Hip Hop Association and the Melvin Van Peebles Trailblazer Award from the American Black Film Festival. Savoy Magazine listed Warrington Hudlin as one of the top 100 most influential blacks in America.

Warrington Hudlin is best known as the producer of popular feature films, HOUSE PARTY, BOOMERANG, and BEBE KIDS and the award winning HBO special, COSMIC SLOP. Warrington Hudlin's most recent work was as the host/producer of the Starz cable television special, UNSTOPPABLE, which featured a dialogue between Hudlin and the legendary pioneers of African America cinema, Melvin Van Pebbles, Gordon Parks, and the late Ossie Davis. Hudlin is currently producing TV and Interactive New Media projects for BET and the N Channel.

Hudlin serves as the Executive Producer of the BFF Lab (the Black Filmmaker Foundation's incubator of multi-cultural, socially concerned, entertainment driven, digital films), where with funding from the Ford Foundation, he has commissioned films by a new generation of filmmakers of color. The BFF Lab's most recent production, a online interactive narrative entitled, WEAPONS OF MISDIRECTION, was funded by the Nathan Cummings Foundation and won a 2005 Webby Award as best political website.

Warrington Hudlin's success in identifying and developing new talent in the BFF Lab led to a MTV networks contract to assist with their diversity outreach in the launch of the Spike TV channel. Hudlin designed and is currently administering similar labs for Time Warner, The N Channel (MTV Networks), and the VOOM HD channels at Rainbow Media.

Warrington Hudlin is the guest film curator and member of the board of trustees of the Museum of Moving Image in NYC. At the Museum, Hudlin curates two monthly film series: Fist & Sword: Martial Arts Films and Black Light: Films from the African Diaspora. Hudlin has programmed film festivals and series in Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean. He co-founded and curated the Acapulco Black Film Festival, which was held in Mexico from 1997 to 2001.

Hudlin is a member of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences and serves on the advisory board of the Tribeca Film Institute's All Access Program, Asian Cinevision, the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment (CAPE), Imagenation Film Festival, the Yale in Hollywood Film Festival, and the national advisory board of the Intel Computer Clubhouse.

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Surj Patel

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Eric Paulos

Eric Paulos is a Research Scientist at Intel in Berkeley, California where he leads the Urban Atmospheres (http://www.urban-atmospheres.net/) projectŃchallenged to use provocative methods to understand the future fabric of our emerging digital and wireless urban landscape. Eric received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley where he researched scientific, and social issues surrounding internet based telepresence, robotics, and mediated communication tools. Eric has developed several internet based tele-operated robots including, Mechanical Gaze in 1995 and Personal Roving Presence devices (PRoPs) such as Space Browsing helium filled tele-operated blimps and ground based PRoP systems (1995-2000) (www.prop.org).
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Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky That Subliminal Kid

Paul D. Miller is a conceptual artist, writer, and musician working in New York. His written work has appeared in The Village Voice, The Source, Artforum, Raygun, Rap Pages, Paper Magazine, and a host of other periodicals. MillerÕs first collection of essays, Rhythm Science, was published by MIT Press in April 2004, and was included in several year-end lists of the best books of 2004, including the Guardian (UK) and Publishers Weekly. In 2006, Sound Unbound, an anthology of writings on sound art and multi-media by contemporary cultural theorists will follow Rhythm Science.

Miller's work as a media artist has appeared in a wide variety of contexts such as the Whitney Biennial; The Venice Biennial for Architecture (year 2000); the Ludwig Museum in Cologne, Germany; Kunsthalle, Vienna; The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and many other museums and galleries. His 2004 solo show at the Paula Cooper Gallery in New York, Path Is Prologue, echoed his live music/ theater/film performance, ŅDJ Spooky's Rebirth of A Nation, which ran simultaneously at the Lincoln Center Festival after premieres in Vienna and at Spoleto USA in Charleston, SC and continues to tour globally.

But even with all this, Miller is most well known under the moniker of his "constructed persona" as "DJ Spooky That Subliminal Kid". Miller has recorded a huge volume of music and has collaborated a wide variety of musicians and composers such as Iannis Xenakis, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Butch Morris, Kool Keith Źa.k.a. Doctor Octagon, Pierre Boulez, Killa Priest from Wu-Tang Clan, Steve Reich, Yoko Ono and Thurston Moore from Sonic Youth among many others. He also composed and recorded the music score for the Cannes and Sundance Award winning film Slam, starring critically acclaimed poet Saul Williams.

In 2006, Miller was given access to the vaults of the classic reggae label Trojan Records, resulting in his landmark compilation release In Fine Style, DJ Spooky Presents 50,0000 Volts of Trojan Records!!! on Sanctuary Records. Prior to that CD, MillerÕs most recently released Drums of Death, featuring Dave Lombardo of Slayer, Chuck D. of Public Enemy, Vernon Reid of Living Color, and Jack Dangers of Meat Beat Manifesto. Other notable recent albums include Optometry (2002), a jazz project featuring Matthew Shipp, William Parker, Joe Mcphee, Carl Hancock Rux, Daniel Bernard Roumain, and High Priest from Anti-Pop Consortium; Dubtometry (2003), a dub remix of the same, featuring Lee "Scratch" Perry and Mad Professor; and Riddim Clash (2004), a collaboration with Twilight Dub Sound System.

In addition to his numerous records and articles released under the DJ Spooky name, another important project was a collaboration with Bernard Tschumi, Dean of Columbia University's architecture department, and author of Praxis: Event Cities. This piece debuted at the Venice Bienniale of Architecture 2000. In the magazine world, Miller is co-publisher along with legendary African American downtown poet Steve Cannon of the magazine, A Gathering of Tribes Š a periodical dedicated to new works by writers from a multicultural context and he was the first Editor-at-large of the cutting edge digital media magazine, Artbyte: The Magazine of Digital Culture.

As DJ Spooky, Miller continues his globe-trotting appearances. In 2004 and 2005 he played at festivals from France to Mexico City, performed a DJ concerto in Oakland and at Yale, gave numerous talks at prominent universities and conferences like the Digital Independence Summit in San Francisco, and participated in the Microsoft's International DJ Summit as well as the UN's "World Summit for Information Society" in Tunis.
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Christiane Paul

Christiane Paul is the Adjunct Curator of New Media Arts at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the director of
Intelligent Agent, a service organization dedicated to digital art.

She has written extensively on new media arts and her book Digital Art (part of the World of Art Series by Thames & Hudson, UK) was published in July 2003.
She teaches as an adjunct in the MFA computer arts department at the School of Visual Arts in New York and the Digital Media Department of the Rhode Island School of Design and has lectured internationally on art and technology.
At the Whitney Museum, she curated the show "Data Dynamics" (2001); the net art selection for the 2002 Whitney Biennial; the online exhibition "CODeDOC" (2002) for artport, the Whitney Museum's online portal to Internet art for which she is responsible; as well as "Follow Through" by Scott Paterson and Jennifer Crowe (2005).
Other curatorial work includes the blackbox at ARCO art fair, Madrid (2006); "The Passage of Mirage" (Chelsea Art Museum, New York, 2004); "Evident Traces" (Ciberarts Festival Bilbao, 2004); "eVolution -- the art of living systems" (Art Interactive, Boston, 2004); "CODeDOC II" (Ars Electronica, 2003); the New York Digital Salon's 10th anniversary exhibition (NYC, 2003); "Mapping Transitions" at the University of Boulder, Colorado (2002); "Re-Media" (Fotofest, Houston, Texas, 2002); and a net art selection for "Evo1" (Gallery L, Moscow, October 2001).
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Holly Willis

Holly Willis is the author of New Digital Cinema: Reinventing the Moving Image (Wallflower Press), which chronicles the advent of digital filmmaking tools and their impact on contemporary media practices. She is also the former editor of RES Magazine, a bimonthly publication devoted to experiments in film, video and new media, and she has written extensively on experimental media practices for a variety of publications. She holds a Ph.D. in Critical Studies in Cinema-Television from the University of Southern California and teaches classes in film, video and new media at USC, Art Center College of Design and California Institute of the Arts.
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